Two years and more than 500 images later, the #GirlWithABook movement has gained international attention and momentum. The power and impact of their collected images, of girls and women from all walks of life holding books and signs saying “I stand with Malala.” have been recognized by organizations such as the National Women’s History Museum and the Half the Sky Movement.

→Read More

[dropcap size=small]D[/dropcap]espite my exhaustion, I couldn’t close my eyes and go to sleep. Above me were millions of stars in the inky-black sky, and below me was the Mediterranean Sea, gently rocking me to sleep on the front deck of the gulet, a two-masted traditional wooden sailing vessel. We were in Turkey to walk the …

→Read More

he school’s administration assured me there was no language barrier in Dubai. Everyone speaks English here, they told me, down to the lowest worker. Before applying for the job, I had needed to look up Dubai on Google Maps. It looked far, far away from Iowa. Via Skype interview at opposite ends of the day …

→Read More

Yes, it can be safe to travel as a woman — even alone, but you can’t be naïve about it. If you want to be safe, there are four major things to consider before going anywhere:

1. Where are you traveling, and what do you know about the place?
2. What are you doing there?
3. Do you attract attention / do you stick out?
4. Can you get help from authorities if you need it?

→Read More

This round-up of natural wonders from the Middle East has something for everyone. For the absurdist Dr. Seussians among us, there are underwater forests and giant cucumber trees. For those with darker and more twisted tastes, there’s dragon blood sap and, oh, you know, THE DOOR TO HELL. But hey, everyone likes a triple waterfall, right? Scroll …

→Read More

This gen­er­a­tion gets their news from The Col­bert Report and The Daily Show, spends President’s Day week­end binge watch­ing House of Cards, and fol­lows Poli­ti­Fact on Twit­ter to sift through the emo­tional per­for­mances of elec­tion debates and cam­paign ads and the vit­ri­olic par­ti­san dis­course com­ing from both sides of the aisle.

→Read More

[dropcap size=small]A[/dropcap]yesha Omer is an artist and educator based in Karachi, Pakistan. Her work addresses issues of public formation, social marginalization and art activism. Recently Misadventures connected with Ayesha, who shared perspectives on arts, education, politics, terrorism, feminism, and religion in Pakistan. [divider]The Interview[/divider] S: Ayesha, great to catch up with you. Could you share …

→Read More

[divider]Context[/divider] Though much of the Middle Eastern region is arid, I still found life springing from the rocks around Jordan’s Ajloun Castle and, months later, in the walls of Morocco’s blue city, Chefchaouen. [divider]The Photographer[/divider] Contributed by Julia Watkins

→Read More

[divider]Context[/divider] For one week, I stayed with a Moroccan family in the village of Ait-Ouahi, where the nearest landmark is a local water bottling plant.  My host father was outdoors working with his livestock each morning by 5 a.m. [divider]The Photographer[/divider] Contributed by Julia Watkins

→Read More

For four months, I called Morocco’s capitol city of Rabat home. Situated on the Atlantic coast, Rabat’s vibe is part parliamentary formal, part surfer chic. [divider]The Photographer[/divider] Contributed by Julia Watkins

→Read More

[divider]Context[/divider] The ancient Jordanian city of Petra may date back to 312 BC, but the views that await those who trek to the top are timeless. [divider]The Photographer[/divider] Contributed by Julia Watkins

→Read More