In Wild, Strayed has this way of writing that is all at once sharp, witty, heartbreaking, and piercingly beautiful—that touches you at your very core. Would a film be able to capture this in any satisfying way?

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The opening shots are of a skier getting ready for the day— “The Mountains” calling on the phone, teeth getting brushed, bites taken out of a breakfast burrito, gear organized in piles—only the toes that hit the floor ready to be shoved into ski boots have bright pink polish on them. And so begins Pretty …

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The documentary Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago beautifully illustrates this interesting, quintessentially human desire to explore the world while exploring the soul. The film follows six individuals the 780 kilometers (nearly 500 miles) from St Jean Pied de Port, located on the French side of the Pyrenees, across the Spanish frontier to the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.

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Photos of modern-day vagabonds riding the rails, sketches of Roman architecture, polar explorations, American banjo pickings married to Chinese lyrics, and dissections of NYC’s underground world are just some of topics covered in this series of talks compiled to stir up your sense of wonder and, maybe, compel you to wander.

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De Passage is Reef’s latest release, and from start to finish it’s pretty mesmerizing. Granted, once again, the women surfers are relegated to their own special section (see “Les Femmes” at 10:15), but, regardless, Alana Blanchard, Tia Blanco, Paige Maddison, and Courtney Eaton are seriously ripping. Watch this for them.

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eet the Pink Helmet Posse: Bella, Relz, and Sierra. These six-year-old girls are crushing gender stereotypes at their local skate park in San Diego, California, where they pop ollies and ride half pipes while decked out in tutus and fairy wings and–of course–bright pink helmets. They’re also the stars of ‘Gnarly in Pink,’ a documentary …

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Women are grossly underrepresented in major Hollywood films. According to a recent article in Variety, “Female characters accounted for only 15% of protagonists in the 100 highest-grossing domestic films of 2013.” Just in time to close out Women’s History Month, here’s a guide highlighting a few fantastic femme-centric films.

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MAKERS: Women Who Make America is a digital and broadcast initiative aiming to make available the inspiring stories of women pioneers. An ongoing project made possible by PBS and AOL, the online platform aims to serve as a continually-updated digital archive of female groundbreakers, trailblazers, and visionaries. The site bills itself as “the largest collection …

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[dropcap size=small]C[/dropcap]hoa Choi’s ice hockey teammates went easy on her at first, because she was a girl. No checking, no stealing the puck. Choi, of course, says she put an end to that. “When I started to play more aggressively, they realized that they did not need to play any different.” Though this documentary looks …

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This gen­er­a­tion gets their news from The Col­bert Report and The Daily Show, spends President’s Day week­end binge watch­ing House of Cards, and fol­lows Poli­ti­Fact on Twit­ter to sift through the emo­tional per­for­mances of elec­tion debates and cam­paign ads and the vit­ri­olic par­ti­san dis­course com­ing from both sides of the aisle.

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[dropcap size=small]W[/dropcap]e don’t have a review of Maidentrip (because we haven’t seen it yet), but I’ve been wanting to learn more about this adventurous girl, Laura Dekker, who controversially set out to sail around the world–alone–at just fourteen years old. Her voyage takes two years, and she documents the trip (including stops in the Galapagos Islands, …

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